It turns out former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans wasn’t dumped from Channel Seven for his unscientific views on health and ‘wellness’

It turns out former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans wasn’t dumped from Channel Seven for his unscientific views on health and ‘wellness’.

The decision to release Pete, 47, from his $800,000 contract was reportedly just a cost-cutting measure, according to .

As the recession hits the TV industry, Seven has been dropping its most expensive assets and Pete was said to be ‘the lowest-hanging fruit’.

Budget crunch: Former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans was dumped from Channel Seven as a cost-cutting measure, and not because of his unscientific views on health and 'wellness'

Budget crunch: Former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans was dumped from Channel Seven as a cost-cutting measure, and not because of his unscientific views on health and ‘wellness’

The publication reported that Seven’s stable of celebrity chefs — including Manu Feildel, Colin Fassnidge, Matt Preston and Gary Mehigan — was costing the network $4million per year.

Manu, Matt and ­Gary are reportedly on $1million per year each, while Colin is said to be earning about $600,000.

Better Homes and Gardens’ Karen Martini and Ed Halmagyi are on $300,000 each.

With advertising spending on the decline, something had to give — and letting go of Pete was apparently an easy way to save money.

Bad times: As the coronavirus recession hits the TV industry, Seven has been dropping its most expensive assets and Pete was said to be 'the lowest-hanging fruit'. Pictured with Manu Feildel

Bad times: As the coronavirus recession hits the TV industry, Seven has been dropping its most expensive assets and Pete was said to be ‘the lowest-hanging fruit’.Pictured with Manu Feildel

On Friday, it emerged Pete had with Channel Seven after a decade as a judge on My Kitchen Rules.

It effectively marked his break from the mainstream after years of flirting with off-the-wall ideas during his tenure at the network.

News of his departure followed weeks of silence from Seven regarding the controversial host’s employment status.

Influential: On Friday, it emerged Pete had 'amicably' parted ways with Channel Seven after 10 years as a judge on My Kitchen Rules. Pictured with his wife, former model Nicola Robinson

Influential: On Friday, it emerged Pete had ‘amicably’ parted ways with Channel Seven after 10 years as a judge on My Kitchen Rules.Pictured with his wife, former model Nicola Robinson

The broadcaster had been ignoring inquiries from journalists about Pete ever since he was fined $25,200 by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for promoting a ‘healing lamp’ he claimed could help cure coronavirus.

Following his departure from Seven, Pete plans to expand his ‘alternative lifestyle empire’ by marketing books, documentaries and other merchandise.

He is set to open a ‘healing clinic’ in Australia’s hippy capital, Byron Bay, where locals are more likely to be receptive to his pseudoscientific ideas.

Work in progress: Having been ousted by the mainstream, Pete is relocating to Australia's hippy capital, Byron Bay, where locals are more likely to be receptive to his pseudoscientific ideas. He is set to open a 'healing clinic' in the Habitat retail precinct (site pictured)

Work in progress: Having been ousted by the mainstream, Pete is relocating to Australia’s hippy capital, Byron Bay, where locals are more likely to be receptive to his pseudoscientific ideas.He is set to open a ‘healing clinic’ in the Habitat retail precinct (site pictured)

 

Inside Pete Evans’ history of controversy — including bizarre claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism and advising against wearing sunscreen — after he was fined for promoting a ‘healing lamp’ he claimed could treat the ‘Wuhan virus’ 

Pete Evans — whose nickname ‘Paleo Pete’ is a reference to his advocacy of the fad Paleolithic diet — was fined $25,200 last month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat .

But it wasn’t the first time he had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims.

From questionable diet advice to strange views on health and wellness, Daily Mail Australia takes a look at Pete’s long history of controversy.

It’s also worth noting that while Pete has drawn the ire of scientists with his views, he has a devoted following in the alternative health space and is regarded by some as a martyr who sacrificed mainstream acceptability in order to preach ‘the truth’. 

Divisive: Pete was fined $25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat coronavirus - but it wasn't the first time the My Kitchen Rules judge had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims

Divisive: Pete was fined $25,200 earlier this month for promoting a lamp that he claimed could help treat coronavirus — but it wasn’t the first time the My Kitchen Rules judge had found himself in hot water over his bizarre theories and unscientific claims

October 2014: Pete claims the Paleo diet can prevent autism

In October 2014, Pete posted a 2,100-word rant on Facebook bizarrely claiming that the modern Australian diet was behind the rise in autism.

Pete took aim at the Heart Foundation and the Dietitians Association of Australia (DAA) while promoting the supposed benefits of the Paleo diet. 

‘Why has our rate of autism jumped from 1 in 10,000 children in 1974, to 1 in 50 in 2014?Where do you think it will be in another 40 years if it is escalating at this rate? This has grown rapidly since the guidelines have been in place!’ he wrote.

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